Real Recon Patient

The Breast Cancer Journey

Facing cancer is without a doubt a challenging passage. Whether you or a loved one are undergoing surgical intervention to cure or to prevent cancer, the surgical options, adjuvant therapies, and outcomes can be overwhelming1.

Real Recon Patient

But nobody fights this fight alone.
Motiva® walks with you during your breast health journey. We have created this simple guide to help you understand breast cancer a little more and help you better prepare for the road ahead.

The content provided here is for informational and educational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice or as substitute for a consultation with a physician.

Breast cancer is the development of abnormal cancerous cells that grow uncontrolled within the breast tissue and develop into a tumor. Although some tumors can be non-cancerous (benign), other tumors, known as malignant tumors, are life-threatening. Breast cancer most commonly begins in the cells that line the milk ducts and lobules within the breast; however, in some cases, cancer cells can invade healthy tissues and make their way into nearby lymph nodes and other parts of the body2.

What Is the Surgical Treatment of Breast Cancer?

Removal of the tumor and a healthy margin of tissue around the tumor

Removal of the full breast tissue

Adjuvant Treatment of Breast Cancer

Uses drugs known as cytotoxic (anti-cancer) drugs, which are usually given to kill cancer cells once 2-4 weeks following your surgery

Uses low doses of radiotherapy to kill cancer cells. Radiation therapy is usually given over a period of around 3-5 weeks every 3-5 days and is usually administered after surgery

Uses drugs or surgery to reduce the production of hormones (estrogen and progesterone) that stimulate the growth of hormone-receptor-positive cancers

Uses drugs to change cell production and growth, preventing cancer from spreading

References

[3] Mastectomy vs. Lumpectomy | Breastcancer.org. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/surgery/mast_vs_lump

[4] Treatment and Side Effects. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment

The content provided here is for informational and educational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice or as substitute for a consultation with a physician.

Real Recon Patient

Breast Reconstruction

Real Recon Patient

What is breast reconstruction?

It is a procedure to replace lost skin and breast volume, which was removed during cancer treatment.

Breast reconstruction can replace lost breast volume, reconstruct the nipple, and restore breast symmetry5.

Reconstruction of the breast is performed at the same time as your mastectomy procedure6.

Reconstruction of your breast is performed as a separated procedure, not at the time of your mastectomy6.

  • Latissimus Dorsi Flap: uses a flap of tissue from your back muscle to reconstruct the breast/breasts.

  • Superior Gluteal Artery Perforator Flap (SGAP) or Inferior Gluteal Artery Perforator Flap (IGAP): takes skin and fat from your buttocks to reconstruct your breast/breasts.

  • Transverse Myocutaneous Gracilis Flap (TMG) or Transverse Upper Gracilis Flap (TUG): takes skin, fat, and muscle from your thigh to reconstruct your breast/breasts.

  • Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (TRAM) Flap: uses skin, tissue, and muscle from your abdomen to reconstruct your breast/breasts.

  • Muscle Sparing Transverse Rectus Abdominis Myocutaneous (MSTRAM) Flap: uses just skin. Tissue is taken from your abdomen to reconstruct your breast/breasts.

  • Deep Inferior Epigastric Artery Perforator (DIEP) Flap: takes a portion of your lower abdomen including skin and fat (leaving behind the abdomen muscle) to reconstruct your breast/breasts.

References

[7] Autologous or “Flap” Reconstruction. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/surgery/reconstruction/types/autologous

One-Stage Reconstruction

A Motiva® breast implant is placed immediately at the time of your mastectomy to reconstruct your breast. One-stage reconstruction can also include MotivaHybrid® surgery to provide extra coverage to the breast, to shape contour, and to enhance the symmetry of your reconstructed breast or breasts.


Two-Stage Reconstruction

The Motiva Flora® Tissue Expander is placed at the time of the mastectomy procedure to expand the skin and create a pocket for a permanent Motiva® implant. Once the expansion process is complete, the Motiva Flora® Tissue Expander is removed and replaced with a permanent Motiva® breast implant. Two-stage reconstruction can also include MotivaHybrid® surgery to provide extra coverage to the breast, to shape contour, and to enhance the symmetry of your reconstructed breast or breasts.

References

[8] Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy – National Cancer Institute. Accessed July 27, 2021. Https://Www.Cancer.Gov/Types/Breast/Reconstruction-Fact-Sheet

The content provided here is for informational and educational purposes only, and is not intended as medical advice or as substitute for a consultation with a physician.

Real stories

Real Story
"I feel more complete now. I feel more alive. I think that it helped me emotionally."
Norma
58
Real Recon Patient
Mom
Real Story
"I challenged myself to grow in things that I had not wanted to grow in before."
Tanisha
36
Real Recon Patient
Mom, conference producer and HR manager
Real Story
"It is a beautiful experience that teaches us that we have to love ourselves, in the first place."
Gretel
64
Real Recon Patient
Mom
"What’s most important to me is the mind. I had to take the train of life and move forward."
Estrella
61
Mom, retired nurse and marathoner
Real Story
"I did it because I wanted to. Why would I settle? I wanted to like the way I looked."
Paola
36
Administrative assistant
Real Story
"My essence today is due to the strength that my mother gave me in her disease process."
Laura
42
Mom, financial consultant

The testimonials, statements, and opinions presented are applicable to each individual. Results will vary and may not be representative of the experience of others. The testimonials are voluntarily provided and are not paid, nor were they provided with free products, services or any benefits in exchange of said statements. The testimonials are representative of patient experience, but the exact results and experience will be unique and individual to each patient.

Considering Aesthetic
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Ask your physician about your options on Breast Reconstruction

Disclaimer

The information presented here is not intended or implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. All content and information contained on or available through this website is for general information purposes only. ESTA makes no representation and assumes no responsibility for the accuracy of the information contained here, and such information is subject to change without notice. You are encouraged to confirm any information obtained from or through this content with other sources and review all information regarding any medical condition or treatment with your physician.

References

[1] Feelings and Cancer – National Cancer Institute. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/coping/feelings

[2] What Is Breast Cancer? | Breastcancer.org. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.breastcancer.org/symptoms/understand_bc/what_is_bc

[3] Mastectomy vs. Lumpectomy | Breastcancer.org. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/surgery/mast_vs_lump

[4] Treatment and Side Effects. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment

[5] Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy – National Cancer Institute. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/reconstruction-fact-sheet

[6] Immediate vs. Delayed Reconstruction | MD Anderson Cancer Center. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.mdanderson.org/treatment-options/breast-reconstruction/immediate-vs–delayed-reconstruction.html

[7] Autologous or “Flap” Reconstruction. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.breastcancer.org/treatment/surgery/reconstruction/types/autologous

[8] Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy – National Cancer Institute. Accessed July 27, 2021. https://www.cancer.gov/types/breast/reconstruction-fact-sheet

Motiva Implants® are not yet commercially available in US and are undergoing clinical investigation pursuant to US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulations for investigational medical devices.

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